About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
. why are we so interested in what happens in people's bedrooms? tavis: dianne feinstein from california is saying they will have hearings. is that necessary? how much uglier is this going to get? >> i think will blow over of tyrolese soon. something will come along to titillate the national interest. i think it is a tragedy. a guide to has given so much has had his name dragged through the mud. >> are the senate hearings necessary? >> you do want to hold hearings on benghazi. i do not think there is any sort of smoking gun. the benghazi thing is the republican equivalent of powerful marijuana. they just love it. i have friends in libya right now. it is a dangerous place. got it. i've also tried to figure out the combat situation. it is very difficult to figure out what happened at what happened -- and what time and what it could've done about it. there is a lot of second- guessing going on. there is nothing more difficult and more stressful and more confusing than combat. >> what is the political fallout going to be from this for the obama administration? >> i do not think it will have
enough four schools in california, two in oregon and two in washington. so geography was important, academics were important and competitive levels were important. now the landscape has changed completely. geography has been thrown out completely. academics have been thrown out completely and, to some degree, competitive levels have been thrown out completely because it's all about what schools can make you the most t.v. dollars and a conference and what conferences can make schools the most t.v. dollars. that's the unifying force now. >> brown: so it's dollars and television. particularly in football, right? >> exactly. a all of those thing changes that have happened over a period of ten years now, because it began when the a.c.c. raided the big east for virginia tech, miami and boston college to improve itself as a football conference to get more t.v. dollars for football. it is about football because basketball actually5/h2y at most schools nets more dollars because the cost is less. but the potential in football because of television dollars is far greater so all of these moves
fire in california. shares fell 2.8%, closing at their lowest price since july. two bright spots for chevron were its smaller refineries processing cheaper oil from montana and north dakota. meantime, chesapeake energy fell to a three month low, down 7.9%. the company has been trying to reduce its massive debt load. today the company said it may delay cutting its i.o.u.'s into 2013. the prospect of the delay was met with selling. you may have missed it but the ipad mini went on sale today. apple's newest product didn't have the usual hoopla. still, analyst expect apple to sell one million or more of the devices during its first weekend on the market. apple stock continued its sell- off that began in the days after its iphone five announcement in september. today, shares fell 3.3%. they are down 18 percent from their all-time high in six weeks ago. solar stocks were not shining for the technology industry today. first solar dropped 8.9%. it cut its full year revenue forecast blaming disruptions in its supply chain thanks to hurricane sandy. sun-power fell 7.9% even though it had a
. as you can see from some of these maps, they showed california as an island and it took a long time for that to actually get removed from the maps-- old maps, it often took 100 years, maybe 200 years. >> reporter: google and others can react more quickly because of all the input they get. thousands of times a day, people all over the world tell google, via the internet, that roads, or signage, or stores or parks have changed, or that a their own neighborhood is poorly represented and that the company needs to update its maps. google investigates the alleged errors, and tries to correct them. the concept of having people on the ground change the map is called crowd sourcing. and it's the principle pioneered by an israeli-based mapping company called waze. that firm, with a small palo alto office, uses g.p.s. to track the location of 27 million drivers who have downloaded its app. waze depends on that crowd to update its maps, determine traffic congestion and direct users to alternate routes. >> so while you're getting a free navigation service, you're also contributing to the communi
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)